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Admission (1)
Conference (12)
Contribution (10)
Course (3)
Exhibition (2)
Lecture (16)
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   Admission
Tianzhu-SSHRC Fellowships 2018-2019 posted date:2017-08-15
Time:Deadline: 2017.11.30

Deadline: November 30, 2017

Summary: The Tianzhu Foundation, with support from SSHRC, will offer two fellowships through the Department of Asian Studies to begin in the 2018/19 academic year. Recipients of these fellowships will have the opportunity to participate in a multi-year international and interdisciplinary project, newly sponsored by SSHRC and led by Jinhua Chen (titled: From the Ground Up: East Asian Religions through Multi-Media Sources and Interdisciplinary Perspectives, 2016-2023). The fellowship will offer opportunities to participate in research visits to East Asia, and to interact with international scholars and students to develop skills in working with local partners and international peers. Recipients will also receive training on how to identify, document, photograph and transcribe primary source materials. Students will learn to work in diverse multicultural, international, and interdisciplinary environments. Two fellowships are available to students pursuing a PhD, with a $25,000-$30,000 annual stipend in Years 1 and 2 and a $25,000 Research Assistantship in Years 3 and 4. Furthermore, each recipient will have access to $2,000 – $5,000 per year in additional funds for research expenses.

Fellowship period:

PhD: September 2018 – August 2022

Eligibility:

This award is open to those who apply for and are accepted into the University of British Columbia’s graduate program in Asian Studies, either at the Doctoral level, with a research project focusing on East Asian Buddhism. Applicants must also be accepted to the program through the regular admission process, and meet all eligibility requirements listed at: http://asia.ubc.ca/graduate/how-to-apply/ (note the application deadline of November 30).

Evaluation Criteria:

Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria: relevance of research proposal, transcripts, CV, strength of reference letter, and capacity for conducting field visits in the Chinese, Japanese or Korean language.

Application Procedure:

Please send the following electronically to vicky.baker@ubc.ca by November 30, 2017.

  • Application form [click here to download the form]

  • CV

  • Copy of your transcripts

  • Three (3) reference letters. These must be sent directly to vicky.baker@ubc.ca by the person providing the reference.

  • All applications will be forwarded to an adjudication committee led by Professor Jinhua Chen.

    Adjudication Procedure:

    Once the adjudication committee has reviewed all applications, qualified applications will be forwarded to the Graduate Committee for further consideration. Results will be announced with the admissions offer in March 2018.
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/189297/fellowship-tianzhu-sshrc-fellowships-2018-2019

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       Conference
    Memento Mori: On Lu Yang's Buddhist Entanglements posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2018.01.20 09:00 ~ 13:00
    Location:TBA

    Abstract

    In this seminar we will take a close look at the Buddhist-inspired work of the Shanghai-based media artist Lu Yang. In particular, we will discuss Lu Yang's Hell and Delusional Mandala.

    Bio

    Francesca Tarocco is Associate Professor of Buddhist Studies and Chinese Religious Studies at Ca' Foscari University of Venice. She is also Visiting Associate Professor of Buddhist Cultures at NYU Shanghai and Co-Founder and Director of the Shanghai Studies Society.

    Organiser: SOAS Centre of Buddhist Studies

    Contact email: vt6@soas.ac.uk
    Related Link:https://www.soas.ac.uk/buddhiststudies/events/holectureseries/20jan2018-memento-mori-on-lu-yangs-buddhist-entanglements.html

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    Buddhist Aesthetics Conference posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.11.09 ~ 2017.11.10
    Location:STANFORD HUMANITIES CENTER

    By invitation only - registration required

    Overview
    NOVEMBER 9, 2017 (ALL DAY) TO NOVEMBER 10, 2017 (ALL DAY)
    STANFORD HUMANITIES CENTER MAP

    Agenda
    November 9, 2017

    9:00am - 12:00pm - Buddhist Manuscript

    1:00pm - 5:00pm - Buddhist Music



    November 10, 2017

    9:30am - 12:25pm - Buddhist Clothing

    1:30pm - 4:30pm - Buddhist Art
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/conferences/buddhist-aesthetics-conference/agenda

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    James A. Benn: "Controversies in the Doctrine and Practice of Self-immolation in Medieval China" posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2018.04.21(ALL DAY)
    Location:TBA



    BY INVITATION ONLY

    Abstract:

    In this seminar we will read selected passages from the chapter on self-immolation (sheshen pian 捨身篇) in the seventh-century Chinese Buddhist compendium Fayuan zhulin 法苑珠林. We will see how the compiler of the work—Daoshi 道世 (596?–683) places a range of somatic practices including burning the body within the context of the propagation of Buddhism. We will note how he deploys key jātaka tales and Mahāyāna sutras as scriptural supports for the practice, and reflect on his choice of hagiographical material from China.

    Bio:

    James A. Benn received his PhD from UCLA in 2001 and is now Professor of Buddhism and East Asian Religions at McMaster University, where he was Chair of the Department 2011-2016. His undergraduate degree is from University of Cambridge and he has an MA from School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He studies Buddhism and Daoism in medieval China. To date, he has focused on three major areas of research: bodily practice in Chinese Religions; the ways in which people create and transmit new religious practices and doctrines; and the religious dimensions of commodity culture. He has published on self-immolation, spontaneous human combustion, Buddhist apocryphal scriptures, and tea and alcohol in medieval China in journals such as History of Religions, T’oung Pao, Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies and Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies. He is the author of Burning for the Buddha: Self-immolation in Chinese Buddhism (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2007) and Tea in China: A Religious and Cultural History (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2015).

    Hwei-Tai Seminar

    April 21 & 22, 2018

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford, Department of Religious Studies
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/james-benn-controversies-doctrine-and-practice-self-immolation-medieval-china

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    Graduate Student Symposium: Mass Meditation posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.10.06 13:00 ~ 17:00

    The fourth annual graduate student symposium at the Institute of Buddhists Studies examines the popularity of meditation practices in contemporary global Buddhisms. Papers will present a range of scholarship from historical perspectives on the modern origins of a diversity of mindfulness practices; scientific studies of Buddhist practice and globalized Buddhist feedback loops; and comparative studies across traditions, between the secular and the sectarian, and the modern and the traditional.

    Keynote Address:
    Dr. Erik Braun, University of Virginia
    “The Morals of Mindfulness”

    Erik Braun is an Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia. He is the author of The Birth of Insight: Meditation, Modern Buddhism, and the Burmese Monk Ledi Sayadaw (University of Chicago Press, 2013), co-winner of the 2014 Toshihide Numata Book Prize in Buddhism. He focuses on Burmese Buddhism in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Pāli literature, and globalizing forms of meditative practice that stem from Burma.

    Graduate Speakers:
    David Pating, Institute of Buddhist Studies
    Beyond Mindfulness: Other Neurosciences and Other Buddhisms

    Sung Ha Yun, University of California, Los Angeles
    Sot’aesan’s Mindfulness Practice in the Context of Modern Korean Buddhist Reformation

    Julia Stenzel, McGill University
    The Phenomenon of Secular Compassion Training and its Loop Back Effect on Traditional Buddhist Discourses

    Solomon P. Botwick-Ries, Marlboro College
    From “Mindful Eating” to Eating Mindfully: a Critical-Constructive Theology

    Schedule:
    1:00 p.m. Welcome remarks
    1:15 – 3:30 p.m. Graduate Speakers
    4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Keynote Adress

    For more information on this event, to RSVP, and to receive updates, please visit our Facebook page.

    This event is sponsored in part by BDK America and the Asia Project at the Graduate Theological Union.

    Download the flyer.
    Related Link:http://www.shin-ibs.edu/event/graduate-student-symposium/

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    2017 Annual Meeting in Boston, Nov 18-21 posted date:2017-08-16
    Time:2017.11.18 ~ 2017.11.21
    Location:boston


    The American Academy of Religion brings thousands of professors and students, authors and publishers, religious leaders and interested laypersons to its Annual Meeting each year. Co-hosted with the Society of Biblical Literature, the Annual Meetings are the largest events of the year in the fields of religious studies and theology. Some 10,000 people are expected for the 2017 Annual Meetings, where more than 1,000 academic sessions and additional meetings will be offered. Plan to join your friends and colleagues in beautiful Boston for the 2017 Annual Meetings!
    Related Link:https://www.aarweb.org/2017-annual-meeting-in-boston-nov-18-21

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    2017-18 Winter Program: Buddhism and East Asian Cultures posted date:2017-08-15
    Time:2018.01.13 ~ 2018.01.21
    Location:Dharma Drum Institute of Liberal Arts (DILA), Taiwan 台灣法鼓文理學院

    2017-18 Winter Program: Buddhism and East Asian Cultures

    Buddhism and East Asian Cultures: An Intensive Program of Lectures Series, Conference/Forum, and Fieldwork

    2017-18年度 佛教與東亞文化國際研修班: 講座系列,研討會/論壇,與參訪

    The Dharma Drum Institute of Liberal Arts (DILA), Sheng-yen Education Foundation, the Buddhist Studies Center in the Humanities College at Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou 廣州, China, and the Buddhist Studies Forum at the University of British Columbia (UBC-BSF) in Vancouver, Canada cordially invite applications for a 9-day program of lecture series, conference/forum, and fieldwork on Buddhism and East Asian Cultures (January 13-21, 2018) in DILA, Taiwan. 台灣法鼓文理學院、聖嚴教育基金會、中山大學人文學院佛學研究中心 (廣州)、 加拿大英屬哥倫比亞大學佛學論壇於2018年1月13-21日,假法鼓文理學院聯合舉辦「佛教與東亞宗教密集研修班」,誠邀海內外青年學子參與!

    I. Venue 地點: Dharma Drum Institute of Liberal Arts (DILA), Taiwan 台灣法鼓文理學院

    II. Schedule 時間: January 13-21, 2018

    • January 13: Registration 報到, Opening Ceremony 開幕式, Keynote speech session for the Conference 研討會主題演講;

    • January 14-15: Conference 研討會;

    • January 16-18: Main Programs (Intensive lecture series) 密集型講座系列;

    • January 19: Young Scholars’ Forum 青年學者論壇;

    • January 20: Tour of sacred sites in Northern Taiwan 北台灣宗教聖蹟參訪;

    • January 21: Home-going 賦歸 (participants who wish to utilize the excellent collection at DILA may apply to spend 3-7 extra days with free boarding. 有需要利用法鼓文理學院豐富藏書者,歡迎申請在課程之後多逗留數日至一週;承辦方將繼續免費提供食宿).



    III. Four-part Lecture Series 四個演講系列:

    The program organizers have invited three international scholars to conduct, all bilingually (English and Chinese), a three-part lecture series related to Buddhism and East Asian Culture, with each part composed of four consecutive 120-minute lectures with a general theme (over four days). These three bilingual speakers and their lecture themes are: 研修班課程邀請以下三位國際學者 (以姓氏羅馬字順序為序),中英文雙語提供3個演講系列 (每個系列圍繞一主題,每個主題涵蓋3個各120分鐘的講演,分別在三天進行):

    • Professor Jinhua Chen 陳金華 (Department of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia, Canada): Knotless Net: Identity and Network in East Asian Buddhism 無結之網: 東亞佛教中的身份與網絡問題;

    • Professor James Robson 羅柏松 (Department of East Asian Languages and Civilization, Harvard University): Buddhist Meditation: From Ideals to Realities 佛教禪定:從理想到現實;

    • Professor Barend ter Haar 田海 (Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford): Writing, Reciting and Buddhism 書寫,誦讀與佛教.


    This three-part lecture series will be accompanied by a fourth of five lectures on Buddhism and East Asian cultures, to be delivered by five scholars based on Taiwan and mainland China. 除此三個雙語演講系列外,還將由五位資深的兩岸學者接力演講 (演講者另行宣佈),蟬連而成另一關於佛教與東亞文化的演講系列。

    IV. Four Additional Projects 其他四項活動:

    In addition to this four-part intensive lecture series, this program also sponsors the following four projects 除四個密集型的演講系列外,還將組織以下四項活動:

  • An international conference on Chan Buddhism and Dunhuang Studies, titled “From the Caoxi Creek to Mogao Cave: Interdisciplinary Studies of Chan Buddhism and the Dunhuang Cache from Multiple Sources and Perspectives,” to be held at the DILA, January 13-15, 2018 (conference information announced at http://frogbear.org/from-the-caoxi-creek-to-mogao-cave-interdisciplinary-studies-of-chan-buddhism-and-the-dunhuang-cache-from-multiple-sources-and-perspectives/); 一個關於禪學與敦煌學的國際研討會:「從曹溪到敦煌:多重資料和不同視角下的跨學科禪宗研究和敦煌寶藏研究」,2018年1月13-15 日假台灣法鼓文理學院舉行 (研討會信息見 http://frogbear.org/from-the-caoxi-creek-to-mogao-cave-interdisciplinary-studies-of-chan-buddhism-and-the-dunhuang-cache-from-multiple-sources-and-perspectives/)

  • Young Scholars’ Forum on Buddhism and East Asian Cultures 青年學者論壇, January 19, 2018; Excellent articles may be recommended to academic journals for publication. They include the Fojiao wenxian yanjiu 佛教文獻研究 (Studies on Buddhist Texts), Foxue yanjiu 佛學研究 (Buddhist Studies), Fojiao shi yanjiu 佛教史研究(Historical Studies of Buddhism), Studies in Chinese Religions, edited by Prof. Fang Guangchang 方廣錩, Prof. Shengkai 聖凱, Prof. Sun Yinggang 孫英剛, and Prof. Jinhua Chen 陳金華, respectively. 計劃於 2018年1月19日假法鼓文理學院 舉行青年學者論壇(研討會)。部分優秀論文可推薦至國內外質優雜誌發表,包括方廣錩教授主編的《佛教文獻研究》、聖凱教授主編的《佛學研究》、孫英剛教授 主編的《佛教史研究》、以及陳金華教授編輯的Studies in Chinese Religions (社科院與英國出版社Routledge合作) 。
  • Taste of the Dharma 禪悅: a series of 1-2 hour sessions providing monastic experiences, including seated meditation, tea-ceremony and other temple rituals 一系列旨在體驗寺院生活的禪悅活動,包括坐禪、品茶、儀軌觀摩等;

  • Tour 參訪: Occasional visits to renowned historical sites (especially Buddhist and other religious temples and shrines) in northern part of Taiwan 參訪北台灣地區的佛寺與文化古蹟.



  • V. Applications 申請手續:

    Participants are required to take part in all of the activities supported by this program, including the four-part lecture series, the Young Scholars’ Forum (paper presentations are optional, but attendance is compulsory), and monastic experience session, etc., with the only exception of field trips, the participation of which is optional. Graduate students specializing in any Buddhist tradition(s) or East Asian religions, and postdoctoral fellows working on relevant fields, are encouraged to apply. Please direct applications and inquiries to buddhistseminarandfieldwork@gmail.com. Please submit applications before October 15, 2017. Each application should include:每位學員應參加本項目所支持的所有活動 (包括演講系列、論壇[可選擇發表或不發表論文,但需列席] 、以及禪悅體驗等)。參訪則隨意。歡迎佛教與東亞宗教或相關專業的研究生以及博士後報名參與 。入學申請務必於2017 年10月15日前提交至 buddhistseminarandfieldwork@gmail.com。申請材料需包括:

  • an application form (to be provided upon request via the above email) 申請表(可經由上述郵箱索取);

  • an updated curriculum vitae 申請者的個人簡歷;

  • one writing sample 寫作樣本 (發表或未發表的);

  • a reference letter (to be emailed by the referee directly to the above email address) 一封推薦信 (需由推薦人直接电邮至以上電子郵箱).


  • VI. Program Expenses 課程費用:

    Successful candidates will be exempted from all tuition fees. Program organizers will also provide free boarding (lodging and meals) in Taiwan during the program period, although participants are expected to cover 學費以及研修期間的食宿──免費

  • the costs for the transportation between their home cities and Taiwan 往返學員所在地與研修地點的機票或車票費用──學員自理

  • an administration fee of US$150 管理費 (1000元人民幣或4500元新台幣)──學員負擔
  • .


    VII. Enrollment Limit 定員: 100 名.

    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/190251/conference-2017-18-winter-program-buddhism-and-east-asian-cultures

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    Reading Chan/Zen Poetry: To Write or Not To Write posted date:2017-08-01
    Time:2017.10.28 10:00 ~ 12:00
    Location:S312, Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Florida International University

    Description
    Examining key examples of 12th-14th century Zen verses that reflect on the debate about where the poetic imagination reflects and enhances or distracts and detracts from the awakened mind.

    Bio
    Steven Heine is professor of Religious Studies and History and Director of Asian Studies at Florida International University. A recipient of the Order of the Rising Sun award from the Japanese government, he has published extensively on the life and thought of Zen master Dōgen as well as the origins and spread of Zen Buddhism in East Asia. Book titles include: Did Dōgen Go to China?, Dōgen and Sōtō Zen, Zen Kōans, Zen and Material Culture, and most recently, From Chinese Chan to Japanese Zen.

    Organiser: SOAS Centre of Buddhist Studies

    Contact email: vt6@soas.ac.uk
    Related Link:https://www.soas.ac.uk/buddhiststudies/events/buddhistforum/28oct2017-reading-chanzen-poetry-to-write-or-not-to-write.html

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    The Heavenly Eye in Caves posted date:2017-08-01
    Time:2017.10.07 09:00 ~ 13:00
    Location:MB4426, Russell Square: College Buildings, Harvard University

    Bio

    Eugene Y. Wang is the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art at Harvard University. A recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship and other awards, he is the art history editor of the Encyclopedia of Buddhism (Macmillian, 2004). His book, Shaping the Lotus Sutra: Buddhist Visual Culture in Medieval China (2005), garnered the Academic Achievement Award from Japan in 2006. His extensive publication covers all periods and aspects of Chinese art. His current research interests include the exploration of artful mind and its materialization. He has served on the editorial board of the Art Bulletin, and the advisory board of Center for Advanced Study in Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. He is currently in the process of founding Harvard CAM (Chinese Art Media) Lab that is devoted to the production of multimedia designs of Buddhist and other cultural experiences. The lab’s pilot projects include “Mind in Caves,” a series of multimedia exhibitions and films of Buddhist cave programs in the manner of “virtual theater,” and an essay film about the contentious rise of the “abstract painting” in Asia in the 1960s.

    Organiser: SOAS Centre of Buddhist Studies

    Contact email: vt6@soas.ac.uk
    Related Link:https://www.soas.ac.uk/buddhiststudies/events/holectureseries/07oct2017--the-heavenly-eye-in-caves.html

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    Mongolian Buddhism posted date:2017-06-30
    Time:2017.09.28 ~ 2017.09.30
    Location:University of California, Berkelry

    Mongolian Buddhism
    Conference/Symposium
    180 Doe Library
    Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Buddhist Studies

    This conference explores the philosophies, texts, arts, and practices of Mongolian Buddhism. A keynote session will be held Thursday afternoon, September 28, followed by full day sessions on September 29 and 30.

    Among the scheduled speakers are:

    Agata BAREJA-STARZYNSKA, University of Warsaw
    Brian BAUMANN, UC Berkeley
    Isabelle CHARLEUX, National Centre for Scientific Research
    Jacob DALTON, UC Berkeley
    Johan ELVERSKOG, Southern Methodist University
    Caroline HUMPHREY, King’s College, Cambridge
    Matthew KING, UC Riverside
    Erdenebaatar OCHIR, UC Santa Barbara
    Weirong SHEN, Renmin University of China
    Uranchimeg TSULTEM, UC Berkeley
    Vesna WALLACE, UC Santa Barbara

    Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809
    Related Link:http://buddhiststudies.berkeley.edu/events/

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    Graduate Student Symposium: Mass Meditation: Practices and Discourses in Contemporary Global Buddhisms posted date:2017-06-21
    Time:2017.10.06
    Location:Jodo Shinshu Center (IBS), 2140 Durant Ave, Berkeley, CA 94704 United States

    The Institute of Buddhist Studies is happy to announce the return of its annual graduate symposium in the fall of 2017.

    Mass Meditation: Practices and Discourses in Contemporary Global Buddhisms

    October 6, 2017—Institute of Buddhist Studies, Berkeley, California

    Call for Papers:

    This conference will focus on the phenomenon of mass meditation (e.g., lay meditation practices, mindfulness, secularization) in contemporary global Buddhism. Of particular focus will be the means by which Buddhist meditation is understood and promoted in various contexts. We welcome submissions that consider how meditation has gained an ambivalent relationship to Buddhism—sometimes being promoted as a “spiritual technology” not connected to any particular tradition, sometimes as the condition sine qua non for Buddhist identity and the only practice recommended by the Buddha. Through the presentations given, we hope to reflect not only on the ways that meditation has been constructed through the Buddhist encounter with modernity, but how it has altered modernity and modern peoples through its global impact.

    Topics include but are not limited to: the origins and popularization of lay meditation practices in Burma, Thailand and Sri Lanka; the Vipassanā (Insight) and Mindfulness movements in North America, Europe, and Asia; meditation practice and the construction of Buddhist identity or subjectivity; the “mystification” of meditation in promotional literature; the use of scientific language to justify and promote meditation both within and beyond Buddhist contexts.

    Dr. Erik Braun, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia and author of The Birth of Insight (co-winner of the 2014 Toshihide Numata Book Award in Buddhism), will serve as the symposium’s keynote speaker.

    Graduate students at any stage of their program are encouraged to submit paper proposals. Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to Thomas Calobrisi (tcalobrisi@ses.gtu.edu). The deadline for submission is July 15, 2017. Applicants will be notified about their submission by August 15, 2017.

    Limited travel funds may be available; low-cost housing is available on site at the Jodo Shinshu Center.
    Related Link:http://shin-ibs.edu/

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    Graduate Student Symposium: Mass Meditation: Practices and Discourses in Contemporary Global Buddhisms posted date:2017-04-26
    Time:2017.10.06
    Location:Institute of Buddhist Studies, Berkeley, California

    Mass Meditation: Practices and Discourses in Contemporary Global Buddhisms

    October 6th, 2017—Institute of Buddhist Studies, Berkeley, California

    This conference will focus on the phenomenon of mass meditation (e.g., lay meditation practices, mindfulness, secularization) in contemporary global Buddhism. Of particular focus will be the means by which Buddhist meditation is understood and promoted in various contexts. We welcome submissions that consider how meditation has gained an ambivalent relationship to Buddhism—sometimes being promoted as a “spiritual technology” not connected to any particular tradition, sometimes as the condition sine qua non for Buddhist identity and the only practice recommended by the Buddha. Through the presentations given, we hope to reflect not only on the ways that meditation has been constructed through the Buddhist encounter with modernity, but how it has altered modernity and modern peoples through its global impact.

    Topics include but are not limited to: the origins and popularization of lay meditation practices in Burma, Thailand and Sri Lanka; the Vipassanā (Insight) and Mindfulness movements in North America, Europe, and Asia; meditation practice and the construction of Buddhist identity or subjectivity; the “mystification” of meditation in promotional literature; the use of scientific language to justify and promote meditation both within and beyond Buddhist contexts.

    Dr. Erik Braun, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia and author of The Birth of Insight (winner of the 2014 Toshihide Numata Book Award in Buddhism), will serve as the symposium’s keynote speaker.

    Graduate students at any stage of their program are encouraged to submit paper proposals. Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to Thomas Calobrisi (tcalobrisi@ses.gtu.edu). The deadline for submission is July 15, 2017. Applicants will be notified about their submission by August 15, 2017.

    Limited travel funds may be available; low-cost housing is available on site at the Jodo Shinshu Center.
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/176494/cfp-graduate-student-symposium-mass-meditation-practices-and

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    2017 AAR Annual Meeting - Registration & Housing posted date:2017-04-19
    Time:2017.11.18 ~ 2017.11.21
    Location:Boston, Massachusetts

    The American Academy of Religion brings thousands of professors and students, authors and publishers, religious leaders and interested laypersons to its Annual Meeting each year. Co-hosted with the Society of Biblical Literature, the Annual Meetings are the largest events of the year in the fields of religious studies and theology.
    Join us for the 2017 AAR & SBL Annual Meetings in Boston! More than 1,200 events—academic sessions, additional meetings, receptions, tours, and workshops—will be offered. Registration, the Exhibit Hall, and the Employment Center will be held in the Hynes Convention Center, 900 Boylston Street, Boston, MA, 02115. Sessions will be held in the Hynes Convention Center, Fairmont Copley Plaza, Hilton Back Bay, Marriott Copley Place, Park Plaza Hotel, Sheraton, and Westin Copley Place. Conference hotels are located within walking distance of one another, except the Park Plaza, which will have a shuttle from the Hynes at peak hours. Register soon to get the best attendee rate and hotel selection!

    For the further information, please see the link below.

    Related Link:https://www.aarweb.org/annual-meeting/registration-housing

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       Contribution
    Journal of the Japanese Association for Digital Humanities, vol 3 (JJADH) posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:Deadline: 2017.11.30

    Dear Colleagues,

    We are now seeking submissions for Volume 3 of the Journal of the Japanese Association for Digital Humanities, to be published in Sept. 2018. Papers on topics that treat Buddhism and DH are warmly welcomed.

    Please see http://www.jadh.org/JJADHv3CFP for details.

    Best regards,

    Charles Muller
    Editor-in-Chief, JJADH
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/246788/cfp-journal-japanese-association-digital-humanities-vol-3-jjadh

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    Oxford Symposium on Religious Studies at the Old Library of the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, Oxford posted date:2017-09-14
    Time:2017.12.04 ~ 2017.12.06
    Location:Old Library of the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, Oxford




    The Oxford Symposium on Religious Studies is a forum for discourse and presentation of papers by scholars who have a particular interest in the study of religion. Canon Brian Mountford MBE, former Vicar of St Mary's Church and Fellow of St Hilda's College in the University of Oxford, will host the meeting.

    You are invited to make a presentation and lead a discussion of a relevant aspect of religious studies, or you may wish to participate as a panel member or as an observer. Your disquisition must adhere to an abstract of about 300 words approved by the Programme Committee of the Symposium. You are, also, encouraged to submit a paper, in keeping with your abstract, which may be published in an appropriate journal, book of conference proceedings. All papers presented for publication or inclusion in books or sponsored journals will be subject to peer review by external readers.
    Related Link:https://www.oxfordsymposiumonreligiousstudies.com/

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    "Cities, Space and the Sacred" 14th International Conference on Urban History, August 2018 posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:Deadline: 2017.10.05

    CFP: Cities, Space and the Sacred: Exploring Urban (Religious) Landscapes in the Modern Era (c.1800-present)

    We are pleased to invite paper proposals for the session “Cities, Space and the Sacred” at the 14th International Conference on Urban History, which will take place from 29 August to 1 September in Rome, Italy. A description of the session appears below.

    Paper proposals may only submitted online, via the EAUH 2018 website. To submit a paper proposal, registration (to the website) is required: https://eauh2018.ccmgs.it/users/. Deadline for paper proposal submission is October 5, 2017.

    For questions regarding the session or proposals, please contact one of the session organizers: Anthony Steinhoff (steinhoff.anthony@uqam.ca) or Martin Baumeister (baumeister@dhi-roma.it) .

    Session M24. Cities, Space and the Sacred: Exploring Urban (Religious) Landscapes in the Modern Era (c.1800-present)

    Coordinators: Martin Baumeister (German Historical Institute, Rome) and Anthony Steinhoff (Université du Québec à Montréal)

    In 1929, the Lateran Treaties between the Holy See and the Italian Fascist regime recognized “the sacred character of the Eternal City.” Rome’s designation as a “sacred city,” however, was highly exceptional, especially within the context of the modern Western world. Indeed, scholars have habitually regarded cities, particularly big cities and metropolises, as hubs and models of political, social and cultural modernization, places where religion and a sense of the sacred were increasingly privatized and marginalized.

    Largely absent from this discussion, however, is a consideration of place and space. In what ways were big cities like Rome also sacred places? How do Western and non-Westerns notions of sacred urban space compare? Prioritizing the issues of space and place, this session aims to reconsider the complex relationship between the city and religion in modern times. By inviting papers from specialists working from a range of different disciplinary and geographic perspectives (including non-European), and inspired by approaches that see space as a social or cultural construction, the session aims to launch an extended discussion of sacred space and the city. The session will focus on three main, closely interconnected themes:

    1) Urban manifestations of the sacred. Here we invite discussions of the changing role of religious sites and buildings in the city, their visibility, the aesthetic and symbolic codes and languages they use, differences and commonalities between religious communities. How far can we consider sacred space as constituent for modern cityscapes? Is sacred space the expression of a specific “urban religion,” of religion practices and attitudes characteristic of modern city dwellers?

    2) The demarcation and perception of urban space as sacred. How have faith communities claimed and competed for urban space? How did "secular" forces react to such claims? Where were lines drawn between profane and sacred space? Have different religious traditions adopted discrete approaches to the notion of “sacred space”? Also welcome here are investigations of the durability of these space claims and topographies and what they might reflect about the shifting senses of "sacred" and "worldly" in the urban environment.

    3) The sacred as a contested category in urban settings. With the rise of the modern nation-state and political mass mobilization, the sacred was often appropriated by new political and social forces, for instance as “civil” or “political religion.” To what degree were these appropriations (e.g. religious architecture, rites, symbols) and encounters specifically urban phenomena? How did they affect, reorganize, and/or transform notions of religion and the sacred in the city? How did they alter traditional ideas about urban sacred space? What might these developments reveal about the relation between traditional and “political religion” and their place in the modern city?
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/205439/cfp-cities-space-and-sacred-14th-international-conference-urban

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    Workshop: "Layers of Interpretation - Commentarial Practices Throughout Buddhist Textual Traditions", LMU, Munich, 15-16 June, 2018 posted date:2017-09-20
    Time:Deadline: 2017.11.05

    The Doctoral Program in Buddhist Studies at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München is pleased to announce a call for papers for the workshop "Layers of Interpretation - Commentarial Practices Throughout Buddhist Textual Traditions,"
    to be held on June 15-16, 2018 in Munich, Germany, with keynote addresses by Prof. Rupert Gethin (University of Bristol) and Prof. Alexander Mayer (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

    We invite applications from both established and early career scholars, including PhD students.
    The deadline for applications is November 15, 2017.

    For the CFP, please click here:
    http://www.buddhismus-studien.uni-muenchen.de/aktuelles/cfp_workshop/cfp_workshop_2018.pdf
    http://www.en.buddhismus-studien.uni-muenchen.de/currentissues/cfp_workshop2018/index.html

    Dr. Simone Heidegger
    Coordinator, Doctoral Program in Buddhist Studies,
    LMU, München
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/192865/cfp-workshop-layers-interpretation-commentarial-practices

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    AAR Western Region, Buddhist Studies Unit 2018 posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:Deadline: 2017.10.01

    Dear colleagues,

    The Buddhist Studies unit of the American Academy of Religion Western Region has put out its call for papers for the 2018 regional meeting. The conference will be held at the Institute for Buddhist Studies in Berkeley from March 23-25. The overall conference theme is "Religion and Kindness." Our unit's CFP is as follows:

    The Buddhist Studies unit invites papers on any topic exploring this year's conference theme. We welcome papers covering any school of Buddhism and from all disciplinary approaches that address any facet of this year’s conference theme “Religion and Kindness,” directly or tangentially, or on other topics related to Buddhism. Please submit proposals to Alison C. Jameson (ajameson@email.arizona.edu) and Jake Nagasawa (jnagasawa@umail.ucsb.edu).

    Paper proposals should be no more than 250 words and are due by Monday, October 1, 2017. Proposals should submitted together with a completed conference participation form which can be found at: http://www.aarwr.com/uploads/2/0/4/2/20420409/aar_wr_participation_form--master.docx

    For more information, please see the AAR/WR website: http://www.aarwr.com/call-for-papers.html.

    Yours,

    Jake Nagasawa

    University of California, Santa Barbara
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/192938/cfp-aar-western-region-buddhist-studies-unit-2018

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    Books on Tibet posted date:2017-08-15
    Time:From now on

    Several new books have come into H-Buddhism recently on Tibet, and I'm looking for people willing to review them. I'm particularly interested in finding someone to review a book in French. Please contact me offline (john.powers@deakin.edu.au)
    if you're interested, and I'll add you to my list and inform you of future titles.
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/189370/call-reviewers-books-tibet

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    Traditional Religions, Secularisms, and Revivals: Buddhism and Shamanism in Northern Eurasia posted date:2017-08-01
    Time:Deadline: 2017.09.10

    Type: Call for Papers
    Date:
    March 9, 2018 to March 10, 2018
    Location: Germany
    Subject Fields: Area Studies, Colonial and Post-Colonial History / Studies, East Asian History / Studies, Eastern Europe History / Studies, Religious Studies and Theology
    The Käte Hamburger Kolleg “Dynamics in the History of Religions” of the Ruhr-University Bochum (http://khk.ceres.rub.de/en/) invites paper proposals for the Workshop “Traditional Religions, Secularisms, and Revivals: Buddhism and Shamanism in Northern Eurasia” to be held on March 9–10, 2018.

    Focusing on Buddhism and Shamanism in Mongolia, Siberia, Central Asia, Tibet, and the Himalayas, the workshop will trace the introduction of Eurocentric secular projects of defining and limiting religion to cultural contexts in which religions, philosophies, and worldviews fundamentally challenge these secular definitions. The categories of “religion” and “secularism” are both products of European modern intellectual history, but they developed out of European perceptions of Christianity and its contrast to non-European “others” and their religions. Scholarship on secularism and its effects, however, has focused overwhelmingly on monotheistic contexts, largely ignoring the role of secularism and the category of religion in socialist secular projects and non-monotheistic religious traditions. The concept of “religion” was not merely imposed from above. It was appropriated and redefined by Buddhists and Shamanists in the twentieth and twenty-first century creating new hierarchies and stimulating new asymmetrical power relations. Since the early twentieth century Buddhism was increasingly used in the processes of nation-building, while Shamanism was continuously marginalized. The socialist secular project in Siberia, Mongolia, and Central Asia demonstrated attempts to integrate religion into building new states (1920s), rigid anti-religious campaigns (1930s), and the moderate recognition and even support of organized religion (1950s—1980s). In contemporary Mongolia and Siberia, Buddhism has once again been elevated to the status of “national” or “traditional” religion, while in Nepal it became a marker of one’s subnational ethnic belonging. In view of the expectations about what national or traditional religion is supposed to be, Shamanism remained contested in all four regional contexts, yet became increasingly popular in heterogeneous revival movements defying both state and religious authority. Examining the ways in which secular projects intersected with Buddhist and Shamanist religious projects promises to open new perspectives on secularism, socialism, and colonialism. Christopher Atwood (University of Pennsylvania) and Nikolay Tsyrempilov (Nazarbayev University) will give keynote lectures.

    We invite papers that focus on the demands to define Buddhism and Shamanism as religions in nationalist, socialist, and post-socialist contexts and the attempts to embrace, surpass and resist such definitions; the interactions between religion and politics and the anti-religious campaigns of the twentieth century; the tensions between religion, nationalism, and the processes of de-secularization or re-secularization that engendered alternative ethnic/religious revivals; the involvement of politicians, academics, and lawmakers with religion and that of shamans, monks, and believers with politics, academia, and law. Submissions on related topics within the relevant geographic and religious areas are welcome. Each paper must explicitly address the issue of secularism or desecularization and, preferably, discuss interactions between different religious denominations or groups within the same religion. The organizers intend to submit a selection of papers to the e-journal Entangled Religions (http://er.ceres.rub.de) for possible peer-reviewed publication. We will be able to provide hotel accommodation and cover travel expenses within Europe, but encourage participants to seek additional funding from their home institutions.

    Please submit a 300-word abstract along with brief biographical information to Secularisms.Bochum@gmail.com before September 10, 2017. Notes of acceptance will be sent before October 10, 2017. Invited participants will be expected to submit full papers of 7,000–10,000 words by February 15, 2018.

    Contact Email: Secularisms.Bochum@gmail.com
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/186083/cfp-traditional-religions-secularisms-and-revivals-buddhism-and

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    Theravada Studies Conference posted date:2017-07-28
    Time:Deadline: 2017.10.01
    Location:Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, Washington DC

    Call for Conference Presentations:

    Theravada Cultures and Civilizations

    The study of Theravada Buddhism has undergone significant reconceptualization in recent years that reflect broader developments in the humanities and social sciences. While seeing Theravada practices no longer as discrete foci of study, Theravada studies as a field ascertains Buddhist formations, practices and sentiments as broadly informed by an imaginaire that is derived in part from a prestige language, Pali, and its literary concerns. Recent work on Theravada Buddhist formations emphasizes comparisons among Theravada iterations, their intersections in world history, social networks and aesthetic formations across regions in South and Southeast Asia, global diasporas and interactions with other religions and cultures.

    The Theravada Studies Group, established in 2013 in affiliation with the Association for Asian Studies, invites scholars and doctoral students in history, art history, textual studies, anthropology, regional and global studies, political science, environmental studies, migration studies, and related fields to submit proposals for presentations at this inaugural conference. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, Theravada material culture, spirit cults, tricksters, ethics, rethinking lay-monastic relations, secularisms and transnational linkages, among other possible themes.

    Submission Guidelines

    Proposals for panels and individual papers should be submitted electronically at Theravadaciv.org no later than October 1, 2017. Formats may include thematic panels (three papers with respondent or four without), roundtables with pre-circulated position papers; and individual paper proposals. Panel proposals must include an abstract (100 words) describing the significance of the panel’s scope and abstracts (100 words) for each paper.

    Following a peer review of submissions, participants will be notified by November 1, 2017 to allow for travel planning in conjunction with the 2018 AAS meetings (March 22-25, 2018). The Theravada Studies Group has some limited funds to assist (especially graduate students) with one night’s accommodation. Registration is free and required at Theravadaciv.org. For further information, please email Theravadaciv@gmail.com

    The conference is organized by the Theravada Studies Group and supported by a grant to the Theravada Civilizations Project from the Henry Luce Foundation’s Asia Program. Logistical support is provided by the Association for Asian Studies and Arizona State University.
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/187648/cfp-theravada-studies-conference

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    The 7th International Conference Buddhism & Australia, call for capers and essays posted date:2017-05-31
    Time:Deadline: 2017.12.31
    Location:Perth, Western Australia

    Call for Papers and Essays
    We have pleasure to announce that the 7th International Conference Buddhism & Australia will be held on 1-3 February, 2018 in Perth, Western Australia. All Buddhists, scholars and members of the general public interested in Buddhism are invited to present their papers in this coming conference. Researchers across a broad range of disciplines are welcomed as well the submission of pre-formed panel proposals
    Important Dates
    Deadline for Abstract Submission: 25 October, 2017
    Deadline for Full Paper Submission: 25 November, 2017

    For those who have prepared for certain big task and who are able to put some sort of idea on certain topics, we have a proposal to compose an essay which needs to create a bridge back to the Buddha. Anyone, from any country, is free to apply. Selected essays will be published on the conference website. Topics
    • Buddha for every home
    • Buddha versus Jesus
    • Buddhism is in the way of economy
    • Buddhist monks - people with weak vitality and mentality
    • Buddhist cosmology and contemporary astronomy and astrophysics are not brothers
    • Virtual reality as the modern day Nirvana
    • Could Buddha turn on a computer?
    • Is virtual reality beyond our reality or not?
    • Who reads the teachings of the dead Buddha?
    Deadline for Essay Submission: 31 December, 2017

    Proposals should be submitted to the following email: info@buddhismandaustralia.com
    We acknowledge receipt and answer to all proposals submitted.

    For detailed information please see here: www.buddhismandaustralia.com

    Contact:
    Organizing Chair Marju Broder
    info@buddhismandaustralia.com
    tel. +61 0 405549923
    www.buddhismandaustralia.com

    Related Link:http://www.buddhismandaustralia.com

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    The 14th Conference of Asian Studies in Israel Call for Papers posted date:2017-04-26
    Time:Deadline: 2017.11.06
    Location:Hebrew Unviersity, Jerusalem

    Call for Papers:The 14th Conference of Asian Studies in Israel (ASI18)

    We are delighted to announce that the 14th Biennial Conference of Asian Studies in Israel (ASI18) will take place at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mt. Scopus Campus, on Wed-Thu, May 23-24, 2018.

    We invite proposals on Asian-related topics (Central, South, East and South-East Asia). Priority will be given to thematic panels (3-4 papers + chair and/or discussant), but individual paper submissions are also welcome. The deadline for submitting proposals for either organized panels or individual papers is November 6, 2017.

    The proposal should include the title of the panel or the individual paper together with a short abstract (150-200 words), as well as a short CV (1 page max) of the presenter/s. With the exception of roundtables, panel proposals should also include the title and abstract of each paper. Please indicate in your proposal what equipment, if any, will be required for your panel or lecture. The conference will be bi-lingual (Hebrew/English). Abstracts can be submitted in either English or Hebrew (preferably both).

    Proposals for panels/papers, as well as all enquiries, should be submitted by email to the conference mail (asi18huji@gmail.com( with copies to the Frieberg Center (eacenter@mail.huji.ac.il) and to the conference's convener, Prof. Michal Biran (ercmongol@gmail.com).

    Conference guests are welcome to stay at the Beit Maiersdorf Faculty Club, located at the conference venue. Priority will be given to foreign participants. The Frieberg Center for East Asian Studies at the Hebrew University will help in covering the accommodation costs of foreign participants but will not be able to participate in the cost of travel.

    Please distribute this call for papers among your colleagues and networks. Both Hebrew and Non-Hebrew speakers are most welcome.

    On behalf of the organizing committee,

    Prof. Michal Biran, Convener, The Frieberg Center for East Asian Studies

    Dr. Nissim Otmazgin, Department of Asian Studies, HUJI

    Dr. Orna Naftali, Department of Asian Studies, HUJI

    Dr. Eviatar Shulman, Department of Asian Studies, HUJI

    Dr. Jooyeon Rhee, Department of Asian Studies, HUJI

    The Department of Asian Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem is the oldest in Israel and is one of the biggest departments in the Faculty of Humanities, home to over 300 students specializing in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Indian Studies. The department is characterized by its excellence in research and teaching, and it maintains an environment of cooperation between students and faculty in a wide array of extracurricular activities. To read more about the department, visit: http://asia.huji.ac.il/en.
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/176969/conference-asian-studies-israel-may-23-24-2018

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       Course
    International Buddhist Academy: AUTUMN COURSES 2017 posted date:2017-07-06
    Time:2017.08.30 ~ 2017.10.26
    Location:IBA, Tinchuli-Boudha, PO Box 23034, Kathmandu, Nepal, 44600

    In addition to The Complete Path course taught in August by His Holiness Ratna Vajra Rinpoche, IBA will offer two philosophy courses and two meditation retreats this autumn. The first philosophy course will be on the Abhidharma and the second on Nagarjuna’s Letter to a Friend. The topics for the meditation retreats will be the cultivation of Calm Abiding (shamatha) and the Four Immeasurables (brahmaviharas).
    Related Link:http://internationalbuddhistacademy.org/autumn-courses-2017/#Philosophy-1

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    Dialog der Kulturen posted date:2017-07-31
    Time:2017.10.15 12:00 ~ 12:30
    Location:IGA Campus

    Mit dem Pavillon „Dialog der Kulturen“ eröffnet die Internationale Gartenausstellung in Berlin Marzahn-Hellersdorf am 13. April um 15 Uhr einen besonderen Begegnungsort für Religions- und Glaubensgemeinschaften. Alle Interessierten sind dazu herzlich eingeladen.

    Feierliche Eröffnung am 13. April

    Die feierliche Eröffnung findet am Donnerstag, den 13. April 2017, ab 15 Uhr statt.

    Nach einführenden Worten von Haladhara Thaler, Künstler und Mitglied im Berliner Forum, werden kurze Denkanstöße aus religiösen Traditionen der Welt vorgetragen, abwechselnd mit Musik. „Heilige Texte, Quellen der Weisheit – Ansprache für Herz und Verstand, werden im Pavillon übergeben – und können ab da von allen Besucherinnen und Besuchern entdeckt werden“, erklärt der Koordinierungskreis.

    Service Mail: service@iga-berlin-2017.de
    IGA-Hotline: 01801 442 2017
    (0,04 €/min dt. Festnetz, höchstens 0,42 €/min dt. Mobilfunknetz)
    Related Link:https://iga-berlin-2017.de/projekte/pavillon-dialog-der-kulturen

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    IBA Studies Online posted date:2016-11-21
    Time:From Now on
    Location:International Buddhist Academy (IBA)


    The International Buddhist Academy in Kathmandu, Nepal was established by Khenchen Appey Rinpoche in 2001. Each year IBA aims to teach one philosophy text and one pith instruction text which supports practice. These two courses are designed to complement each other, providing a balanced approach between understanding the profound meaning of the Buddha’s teachings and applying it in one’s life.

    The IBA STUDIES ONLINE website has been created to offer students from all over the world access to the Dharma courses held over the past years at the International Buddhist Academy in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    The courses are all free of cost. In accordance with the ancient tradition of requesting the Dharma from the teacher, we ask students to register on this website to have full access to the courses.

    Related Link:http://www.ibastudiesonline.com/

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       Exhibition
    The Buddha’s Word @ Stanford posted date:2017-09-14
    Time:2017.10.18 ~ 2018.03.18
    Location:Madeleine H. Russell Gallery

    This exhibition showcases Buddhist manuscripts and prints held at the Cantor and in Stanford libraries, rangiSutrang in dates from around the 11th century to the early 20th century, and coming from various parts of the traditional Buddhist world, from Sri Lanka to Japan. The Buddha’s Word highlights the written word not simply as the visual counterpart to speech but as a thing of beauty and sacredness in and of itself.

    IMAGE: Artist unknown (Nepal, 12th C.), Pages from a Manuscript of the Perfection of Wisdom Sutra (Prajnaparamita), detail, 12th century. Ink and color on palm leaf. Museum Purchase Fund, 1964.115.a
    Related Link:https://museum.stanford.edu/view/exhibition_sched_new.html#future_exhibitions

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    First exhibition of Gandhara Buddhist Antiquities Opens in South Korea posted date:2017-07-06
    Time:2017.06.29 ~ 2017.09.30
    Location:Interart Channel, Seoul, South Korea

    About forty artifacts belonging to the Gandhara civilization from Peshawar Museum in Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province are currently on exhibit in Seoul, South Korea. The exhibition titled, “Gandhara through International Cooperation,” was inaugurated on 29 June with delegates from over 45 countries present to witness the ceremony, and will continue until 30 September this year.

    The exhibit is jointly organized by the Inter-Art organization in Korea, and the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Directorate of Archaeology and Museums in Pakistan. The federal government of Pakistan issued a license for the exhibit after both countries reached an agreement with the terms and conditions of the exhibition.

    The objects on display have an insurance value of about US$106 million dollars, and include 25 relics based on the life of the Buddha, and a reliquary of Kanishka, which dates back to the first year of the reign of Kushan Emperor Kanishka (c. 127-150 CE) and was discovered in 1992 in the relic chamber of the great stupa at Shah-Ji-ki Dheri in Peshawar.

    According to Dr. Abdul Samad, director of the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Archaeology and Museums, the exhibition will run for three months to give the people of South Korea enough time to visit the Gandhara Buddhist remains and foster awareness among the South Korean public as to why they should visit Pakistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa's holy sites, monasteries, and archaeological ruins. “This exhibition will not only display the archaeological objects but also boost and promote religious tourism for which the province has great potential,” said Dr. Samad. (Dawn)

    Asif Raza, the curator of Peshawar museum, said the exhibition will help to attract international tourists for the region and the museum by giving a glimpse into the rich archaeology of the region. “It will promote tourism and archeological site of the province.” (The Express Tribune)

    South Koreans hold the collection of artifacts from Gandhara civilization in high regard since Buddhism was introduced to South Korea by monks hailing from what is now Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. “[Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province] is a holy place for Koreans. Buddhism reached Korea from this part of the world through a monk named Maralanda [Maranatha] in 4th century CE,” Dr Samad explained. (Dawn)

    Korean Buddhism can be directly traced back to the Gandhara civilization. The Gandharan monk Maranatha introduced Buddhism in Korea in 384 CE and many reference to Gandhara’s Greco-Buddhist art can be found there. For instance, the UNESCO World Heritage-listed Seokguram Grotto, part of Bulguksa Temple in Gyeongju, in South Korea’s Northern Gyeongsang Province, is thought to have been inspired by Gandharan art, and the Korean National Treasure No. 83, the bronze sculpture “Maitreya in Meditation,” is thought to have been based on Gandharan images.

    Pakistani ambassador to South Korea Zahid Nasrullah Khan has emphasized in the past that Pakistan wants to build Buddhist cultural bridges with the Korean people. The current exhibition will not only showcase unique examples of Gandhara art but also highlight the centuries-old religious ties between South Korea and Pakistan. (Dawn)
    Related Link:https://www.buddhistdoor.net/news/first-exhibition-of-gandhara-buddhist-antiquities-opens-in-south-korea

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       Lecture
    Altar Modern: Buddhist-inspired Artists and Visual Practices in Contemporary China posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2018.01.19 17:30 ~ 19:00
    Location:Venue: Brunei Gallery Room: BGLT

    Abstract
    Altar Modern looks at contemporary representations of Buddhism in the visual arts in China. Drawing from a large body of previously unexamined paintings, drawings, photographs and installations, it maps the history of Buddhist visual practices onto a larger trans-regional history of China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and North America between 1997 and 2017. It analyses works by artists from across different generations and locations as they reflect both literally and metaphorically on fundamental themes of Chinese Buddhist iconography and ritual, including the relationship between merit making and image making, the use of calligraphy and writing as religious practice, ideas of image consecration, relics, and the ritual use of objects, as sites invoking a "reworking of the imaginary" for contemporary artists.

    Bio
    Francesca Tarocco is Associate Professor of Buddhist Studies and Chinese Religious Studies at Ca' Foscari University of Venice. She is also Visiting Associate Professor of Buddhist Cultures at NYU Shanghai and Co-Founder and Director of the Shanghai Studies Society.

    Organiser: SOAS Centre of Buddhist Studies

    Contact email: vt6@soas.ac.uk
    Related Link:https://www.soas.ac.uk/buddhiststudies/events/holectureseries/19jan2018-altar-modern-buddhist-inspired-artists-and-visual-practices-in-contemporary-china-.html

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    Polishing the Buddha’s Sacred Text? A methodological reconsideration of the significance of variant readings in the most popular Mahāyāna code in East Asia posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.12.08 17:30 ~ 19:00
    Location:TBA

    Abstract
    The Fanwang jing or the Scripture of the Pure Divinities' Netted [Banners], sometimes called Brahmajāla-sūtra or Brahmā's Net sūtra, is in fact a Chinese Buddhist apocryphon composed around the mid-fifth century. I have recently published an edition of the text in book form, by consulting over five earlier manuscripts dating from before the 10th century, two stone inscriptions, and ten woodblock print editions during the 12th-18th centuries. Surprisingly enough, the Fanwang jing, which is merely seven pages long in the modern Taisho Canon, has as many as over six hundred variant readings. More importantly, a large majority of those variants suggest not scribal errors but a clear intention to improve ‘awkward’ or ‘ambiguous’ wording in the original text. As a result, I am led to consider a new methodology for editing this type of texts and the reasons such copious amounts of variants were produced; the latter point is directly related with the question of whether the Chinese readers aimed to ‘correct’ the Buddha's words.

    After a short overview of the contents and some essential characteristics of the scripture, I will examine the characteristics of textual emendation, classifying the types of variant readings into several kinds in terms of religio-philosophical contents and consistency/inconsistency of format. I will also briefly compare the nature of Chinese Buddhist apocrypha with Mahāyāna texts in India, and consider a fundamental difference in the value of variant readings between Sanskrit commentarial treatises on Buddhist philosophy and Chinese Buddhist translations of sutras. Finally, referring the commentators' idea on variant readings, I will try to draw a conclusion regarding whether or not medieval Chinese Buddhists intended to correct sacred texts.

    Bio
    Funayama Toru, born in 1961, is currently a professor of Buddhist studies at Institute for Research in Humanities, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan. His research mainly covers two different areas in the history of Buddhism. One is Chinese Buddhism from to the fifth/seventh centuries, a period from the late Six Dynasties period up to early Tang; his focuses are on the formation of Chinese Buddhist translation and apocrypha, spread of the notion of Mahayana precepts, the exegetical tradition on the Nirvana Sutra, and more.

    The other is philological and philosophical issues in Buddhist epistemology and logic in India from the fifth/tenth centuries, particularly Kamalasila’s (the late eighth century) theory of perception. In both areas, he is interested in the concept of saintliness as firmly related with the system of practice.

    His most recent publications included the study and edition of the Fanwang jing: Higashi Ajia bukkyō no seikatsu kisoku Bonmō kyō: saiko no katachi to hatten no rekishi 東アジア仏教の生 活規則『梵網経』─最古の形と発展の歴史 (The Scripture of the Pure Divinities' Netted [Banners] (Fanwang jing), Mahayana Code for Daily Life in East Asian Buddhism: The Oldest Form and Its Historical Evolution), Kyoto: Rinsen shoten, 2017, 528p.

    Organiser: SOAS Centre of Buddhist Studies

    Contact email: vt6@soas.ac.uk
    Related Link:https://www.soas.ac.uk/buddhiststudies/events/holectureseries/08dec2017-polishing-the-buddhas-sacred-text-a-methodological-reconsideration-of-the-significance-of-.html

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    Buddhist Revelations in Mongolian Contemporary Art: Artist Soyolmaa Davaakhuu in Conversation with Uranchimeg Tsultem posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.09.28 14:00 ~ 15:00
    Location:180 Doe Library


    Mongolian artist Soyolmaa Davaakhuu will discuss her work with art historian Uranchimeg Tsultem. Soyolmaa Davaakhuu's art is based on her profound interest and practice of Buddhism. She is one of very few artists in Mongolia who aim to find new modernist style of expression of Buddhist images, motifs and symbols. She studied Buddhism and with the approval of her guru, she is able to create new forms and iconographies for Buddhist deities and their manifestations. Works by the artist will be on display. Her art was shown in UK, USA, Canada, South Korea, Vietnam, and Mongolia. The exhibition opening will include the artist's talk.

    Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809
    Related Link:http://buddhiststudies.berkeley.edu/events/

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    2017 WEHOPE DHARMATHON: A SERIES OF DHARMA MESSAGES posted date:2017-09-14
    Time:2017.09.27 19:00 ~ 20:15 、 2017.09.28 16:00 ~ 17:15
    Location:JODO SHINSHU CENTER 2140 DURANT AVE. BERKELEY, CA

    Two Dharmathon sessions will be held September 27 & 28,
    2017 as part of the second WEHOPE gathering of
    international Jodo Shinshu ministers and ordained ministers’
    assistants from the Jodo Shinshu Hongwanji-ha (Nishi
    Hongwanji) and the Shinshu Ohtani-ha (Higashi Honganji)
    WEHOPE (West & East Hongwanji Overseas Propagation
    Exchange) provides opportunities for Kaikyoshi ministers,
    Kyoshi ministers, and ministers’ assistants with Tokudo
    ordination from Hawaii, Canada, South America, Shinshu
    Ohtani-ha, and the Buddhist Churches of America (BCA) to
    come together to study and exchange ideas about the future
    of the Jodo Shinshu Buddhist movement.
    Related Link:http://www.buddhistchurchesofamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2017_09_dharmathon_flyer.pdf

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    Fall Japanese Dharma Gathering at the Jodo Shinshu Center posted date:2017-09-14
    Time:2017.09.30 10:00 ~ 14:00
    Location:浄土真宗センター 2140 Durant Ave, Berkeley


    Related Link:http://www.buddhistchurchesofamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2017_09_30_jpnz_seminar.pdf

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    Oliver Freiberger: "Lines in Water? On Drawing Buddhism's Boundaries in Ancient India" posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2018.05.24 17:30 ~ 19:00
    Location:TBA



    FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

    Abstract:

    This talk explores the ways in which religious agents – and modern scholars – distinguish religions. Illustrated by examples from ancient India, it will problematize the popular notion of blurred boundaries and suggest a multilayered approach for analyzing religious boundary-making. The paper argues that scholars should be prepared to find, even within one religious community, numerous and possibly conflicting ways of drawing a boundary between “us” and “them.”

    Bio:

    Dr. Oliver Freiberger is associate professor of Asian Studies and Religious Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Trained in Indology and Religious Studies, he received his Ph.D. from Göttingen University, Germany. His first book explored the meaning of the sangha (monastic community) in the doctrinal sections of the Pali canon. His second book was a micro-comparative study of ascetic discourses in ancient Indian and early Christian texts. He also co-authored an introductory handbook of Buddhism, (co-)edited several volumes and is the author of numerous articles and chapters on Indian Buddhism, asceticism, and method and theory in the study of religion. Currently he works on a book about the comparative method.

    Buddhist Art

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/oliver-freiberger-lines-water-drawing-buddhisms-boundaries-ancient-india

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    Rupert Gethin: "On Death and Rebirth, and What Happens in Between: Two Buddhist Accounts of Why it Matters" posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2018.05.17 17:30 ~ 19:00
    Location:TBA



    FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

    Abstract:

    Ancient Indian Buddhist thinkers for the most part took it as given that death was followed by rebirth, but they disagreed on whether death was followed immediately by rebirth or by an in between state (antarābhava). The lecture will consider two accounts of death and rebirth, both from the fourth to fifth centuries CE but representing the traditions of two different schools: (1) the account found in Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakośa, which presents the traditions of the Sarvāstivāda school and advocates an in between state, and (2) the account found in the Pali commentaries of the Theravāda school, which advocates immediate rebirth. Both accounts argue that the authority of Buddhist scriptures and reason are on their side. But what other considerations might inform their different positions?

    Bio:

    Rupert Gethin is Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Bristol and President of the Pali Text Society. His books include Sayings of the Buddha: A Selection of Suttas from the Pali Nikāyas (2008), The Foundations of Buddhism (1998), and The Buddhist Path to Awakening (1992). He has a particular interest in early Indian Buddhist literature and Indian Buddhist systematic accounts of the mind and meditation. He is currently working on a book provisionally titled 'Mapping the Buddha’s Mind: a study of Indian Buddhist systematic thought in the Abhidharma of the Theravāda, Sarvāstivāda, and Yogācāra traditions’.

    Evans-Wentz Lecture

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford, Department of Religious Studies
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/rupert-gethin-death-and-rebirth-and-what-happens-between-two-buddhist-accounts-why-it-matters

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    Tim H. Barrett: "A Possible Buddhist Influence on Chinese Political Thought" posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2018.05.03 18:00 ~ 19:30
    Location:TBA



    FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

    Abstract:

    Much work has been done in recent decades on the way in which Chinese rulers made use of Buddhism to bolster their power, but in fact some Buddhist ideas concerning kingship found in South Asian materials were quite negative. China was in imperial times an autocracy in which such negativity towards kingship generally did not flourish. But if we look carefully, is there really no trace at all of these Buddhist ideas entering the Chinese tradition of political thought? This lecture will suggest that at one point one subversive suggestion may have slipped in, and may indeed have exerted a hidden but not inconsequential influence.

    Bio:

    Tim H. Barrett is Emeritus Professor of East Asian History at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He studied Chinese at Cambridge and Buddhist Studies at Yale, and spent much of his career publishing on the history of the religious traditions of East Asia, primarily with regard to China"

    Shinnyo-en Visiting Professor Lecture

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford, Department of Religious Studies
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/tim-h-barrett-possible-buddhist-influence-chinese-political-thought

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    Rev. Shojun Ogi: "Re-Focusing Buddhism in Modern Japanese Society: New Dimensions in Contemporary Japanese Buddhism" posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2018.03.08 17:30 ~ 19:00
    Location:TBA



    FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

    Abstract:

    Historically, especially after World War II, Japanese Buddhist temples became focused mainly on conducting funeral rituals, various commemorative memorials, the selling of talismans, and conducting prayer rituals in the name of good fortune, happiness and safety. This led Japanese society, including both Buddhist priests and public at large to come to believe that Buddhism was only relevant regarding death or wishes.

    However, recognizing the declining position of Buddhism in contemporary Japan, some Buddhist priests have begun creating and implementing a variety of new activities and ideas in their attempts to revitalize the teaching of Buddha to deal with contemporary needs in modern society.

    Bio:

    Rev. Shojun Ogi

    Born in 1982, Ogi is the vice resident priest of Choshoji Temple which belongs to the Jodo Shinshu Hongwanji-ha sect in Yamaguchi, Japan. He earned a BA from Ryukoku University and an MA from Graduate Theological Union/Institute of Buddhist Studies in Berkeley, CA. In 2011 he completed a one-year Residential Fellow Program at the Harvard Divinity School. He has given many lectures on Buddhism at temples, universities, and seminars through his non-sectarian Buddhist promotional activities and developed a unique introduction to the Buddha’s teachings via the mass media on national television and radio programs in Japan. In addition, he has written and translated many articles and books on Buddhism for the contemporary world.

    Distinguished Buddhist Practitioner Lecture Series

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/rev-shojun-ogi-re-focusing-buddhism-modern-japanese-society-new-dimensions-contemporary

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    Barbara Rossetti Ambros: "On Talking Terms with Mihotokesama: Material and Bodily Practices of a Jōdo Shin Healer" posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2018.03.01 17:30 ~ 19:00
    Location:TBA



    FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

    Abstract:

    The life story of Takumi Toyoko (b. 1929) illustrates the material and corporeal practices of popular Jōdo Shin in the Hokuriku region. At the intersection between a secret Jōdo Shin confraternity and a healer with an open clientele, Takumi and her devotees challenge stereotypical notions of Jōdo Shin as being opposed to magic and folk traditions. Rather than emphasizing scriptural authority, Takumi communicates directly with the Buddha Amida and wields her own body as a vehicle of salvation. Yet Amida is not Takumi’s only source of divine wisdom. She also communicates with a variety of Buddhist divinities, Shintō kami, ancestors, and animal spirits and manipulates icons and other material objects to effect healing for her clients. Based on ethnographic fieldwork and Takumi’s autobiography, this paper argues that Takumi’s embodied and affective practices defy hegemonic constructions of a Jōdo Shin identity.

    Bio:

    Barbara Rossetti Ambros is a professor in East Asian Religions in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research on Japanese Religions has focused on issues in gender studies; human-animal relationships; place and space; and pilgrimage. She is the author of Women in Japanese Religions (New York University Press, 2015), Bones of Contention: Animals and Religion in Contemporary Japan (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2012), and Emplacing a Pilgrimage: The Early Modern Ōyama Cult and Regional Religion (Harvard University Asia Center, 2008). She has been serving as co-chair of the Animals and Religion Group of the American Academy of Religions since 2014. Previously, she served as the co-chair of the Japanese Religions Group at the American Academy of Religions from 2008 to 2014 and as the President for the Study of Japanese Religions from 2008 to 2011. She holds a PhD in East Asian Civilization and Languages from Harvard University (2002), an MA in Regional Studies East Asia from Harvard University (1995), and an MA in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University (1993).

    Japanese Buddhism Lectures

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/barbara-rossetti-ambros-talking-terms-mihotokesama-material-and-bodily-practices-j-do-shin

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    Heather Blair: "What Counts? Buddhism, Picturebooks, and Japanese Culture" posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2018.02.22 17:30 ~ 19:00
    Location:TBA



    FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

    Abstract:

    Jokes about hell, fake sutras that, though specious, exert miraculous effects, and stories about a bodhisattva who is as well loved for his failures as for his assistance. These and other playful engagements with Buddhist ideas and imagery pervade picturebooks from Japan’s secular mainstream. But do they count as Buddhist? Focusing on picturebooks published for children from the 1960s to the present, this talk asks what it might mean to be culturally—without necessarily being confessionally—Buddhist. It presents an argument that picturebooks foment a doublemindedness among both children and adults, thereby opening up a space for ironic engagement with religious ideas and imagery. As one way of simultaneously doing and not doing religion, this ironic mode suits the current Japanese context, where social belonging matters deeply but believing is not a priority, and where knowledge of religious figures and devotional practices contributes substantially to social competency and cultural literacy. Especially in light of recent academic work that has called attention to the attenuation of mainstream Buddhist institutions and traditional practices in Japan, consideration of the kind of diffuse, unmarked religiosity seen in picturebooks compels us to think carefully about what counts for the study of Buddhism—and how we account for it.

    Bio:

    Heather Blair is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Indiana University. A Japan specialist, she focuses primarily on lay religiosity and intersections between visual culture and religion, both in the Heian period and modern-to-contemporary times. Her publications include Real and Imagined: The Peak of Gold in Heian Japan (2015) and articles in venues such as Monumenta Nipponica, Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, and Japanese Journal of Religious Studies. She is currently working on a monograph with the provisional title The Gods Make You Giggle: Finding Religion in Japanese Picturebooks.

    Japanese Buddhism Lectures

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/heather-blair-what-counts-buddhism-picturebooks-and-japanese-culture

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    Ajahn Jayanto: "A Call of the Heart: A Monk's Life Today" posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.10.17 17:30 ~ 19:00
    Location:LEVINTHAL HALL, HUMANITIES CENTER



    FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC MAP

    Abstract:

    Ajahn Jayanto will offer reflections on his life as a Theravada Buddhist monk in England, Thailand, and the U.S., and why the ancient Buddhist monastic vocation has become meaningful to increasing numbers of people in our modern societies.

    Bio:

    Ajahn Jayanto was born in Boston in 1967. During his university years a period of world travel kindled a great interest in the spiritual life. In 1989 he joined the monastic community of Ajahn Chah and Ajahn Sumedho at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery in England. He trained at monasteries of that community in England until 1997, then embarked on a period of practice in Thailand and other Asian Buddhist countries. Returning to the UK in 2006 he served in the community at Amaravati until moving to New Hampshire in 2014. Since 2009 Ajahn Jayanto has helped guide long-standing local efforts to establish a branch monastery of the Ajahn Chah community in New England, and he now serves as abbot of Temple Forest Monastery, in the small town of Temple, NH.

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/ajahn-jayanto-call-heart-monks-life-today

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    Reiko Ohnuma: "When Animals Speak: Speaking Animals in the Pāli Jātakas" posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.10.05 17:30 ~ 19:00
    Location:LEVINTHAL HALL, HUMANITIES CENTER



    FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC MAP

    Abstract:

    The Pali Jātaka collection contains many stories that might be described as “animal fables,” featuring highly anthropomorphized animal characters who think, speak, plan, and reason, much in the manner of human beings. Their use of human language and the fact that they speak, not only to each other but also (in many cases) to the human beings they encounter, sharply distinguishes them not only from the more naturalistic animals depicted elsewhere in Buddhist literature, but also from the Buddhist doctrinal view of animals as a lowly realm of rebirth, devoid of wisdom, rationality, and moral agency. How, then, should we interpret the animal fables of the Pali jātakas and their depiction of animals who speak? Are these animals just allegorical human beings, or does their animality continue to matter? Why do they speak, what do they choose to speak about, and what can they tell us about the difficulties of communicating across the human/animal divide?

    Bio:

    Reiko Ohnuma is Professor of Religion, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Dartmouth College. She is the author of Head, Eyes, Flesh, and Blood: Giving Away the Body in Indian Buddhist Literature (Columbia, 2007); Ties That Bind: Maternal Imagery and Discourse in Indian Buddhism (Oxford, 2012), and Unfortunate Destiny: Animals in the Indian Buddhist Imagination (Oxford, 2017).

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/reiko-ohnuma-when-animals-speak-speaking-animals-p-li-j-takas

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    How to Experience Buddhist Caves as Virtual Reality posted date:2017-08-01
    Time:2017.10.06 17:30 ~ 19:00
    Location:Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre, Brunei Gallery, Harvard University

    Abstract
    Plato’s Cave has often been claimed as the progenitor of the film medium. It has also been reclaimed for much of the projection technology such as automated virtual environment. While the claims are conceptually fitting, they come short of historically substantiating what happened in between Plato’s time and ours. The alignment is long on the analogy between the projected shadows on the wall and the projection apparatus, but short, historically, on making much out of the cave setting. Along the same line of thinking, one could profitably claim Buddhist caves as the forerunner of the virtual-reality technology. What makes this new alignment worth pondering is that it makes good on the cave claim in earnest.
    Around 400 CE, the lore of a proverbial “Shadow Cave” was spreading in Asia, leading to the creation of such a cave in China around 420. While the historical site no longer exists, cave shrines inspired by the “Shadow Cave” have survived to this day. Moreover, murals inside such caves testify to the endurance and spread of the “Shadow Cave” idea. Not that the fifth-century caves constitute an origin of the visual technology of the virtual reality environment we have today; rather, such an alignment says much about visual technology both in its early aspiration and its present-day practice. Early mural caves aspired toward the condition of a virtual world. It just didn’t quite have the apparatus. Our present-day virtual environment technology fulfills that aspiration, and in doing so, it delivers an experience that is not necessarily modern. In light of this, caves are as not so old as we think, and our virtual reality technology not so new. Professor Wang’s lecture shows why and how so.

    Bio
    Eugene Y. Wang is the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art at Harvard University. A recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship and other awards, he is the art history editor of the Encyclopedia of Buddhism (Macmillian, 2004). His book, Shaping the Lotus Sutra: Buddhist Visual Culture in Medieval China (2005), garnered the Academic Achievement Award from Japan in 2006. His extensive publication covers all periods and aspects of Chinese art. His current research interests include the exploration of artful mind and its materialization. He has served on the editorial board of the Art Bulletin, and the advisory board of Center for Advanced Study in Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. He is currently in the process of founding Harvard CAM (Chinese Art Media) Lab that is devoted to the production of multimedia designs of Buddhist and other cultural experiences. The lab’s pilot projects include “Mind in Caves,” a series of multimedia exhibitions and films of Buddhist cave programs in the manner of “virtual theater,” and an essay film about the contentious rise of the “abstract painting” in Asia in the 1960s.

    Organiser: SOAS Centre of Buddhist Studies

    Contact email: vt6@soas.ac.uk
    Related Link:https://www.soas.ac.uk/buddhiststudies/events/holectureseries/06oct2017-how-to-experience-buddhist-caves-as-virtual-reality.html

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    Philosophy and Philology in Edo Commentaries on Dōgen's Shōbōgenzō: Construction and Deconstruction of the 95-Fascicle Honzan Edition posted date:2017-08-01
    Time:2017.10.27 17:00 ~ 19:00
    Location:Venue: Brunei Gallery Room: TBA

    The Shōbōgenzō 正法眼蔵 by Dōgen (1200-1253), founder of the Sōtō Zen sect in medieval Japan, has become one of the best-known East Asian Buddhist texts because its intricate evocation and eloquent elucidation of Chinese Chan sources in Japanese vernacular emphasizes a dynamic view of reality and multi-perspectival approach to discourse. However, there remain many misconceptions about the formation and structure of the text, especially in terms of how, when, where, and why it was written. The aim of this lecture is to correct one of the main areas of oversight by highlighting the role of more than six dozen Edo-period commentaries neglected in Western scholarship, while showing that only through examining these complex materials in terms of their respective approaches to textual hermeneutics involving philosophy and philology can the gap between the author’s intentionality and modern interpretations be bridged.

    Bio
    Steven Heine is professor of Religious Studies and History and Director of Asian Studies at Florida International University. A recipient of the Order of the Rising Sun award from the Japanese government, he has published extensively on the life and thought of Zen master Dōgen as well as the origins and spread of Zen Buddhism in East Asia. Book titles include: Did Dōgen Go to China?, Dōgen and Sōtō Zen, Zen Kōans, Zen and Material Culture, and most recently, From Chinese Chan to Japanese Zen.

    Organiser: SOAS Centre of Buddhist Studies

    Contact email: vt6@soas.ac.uk
    Related Link:https://www.soas.ac.uk/buddhiststudies/events/buddhistforum/27oct2017-philosophy-and-philology-in-edo-commentaries-on-dgens-shbgenz--construction-and-deconstruc.html

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    IASBS Events at AAR posted date:2017-08-16
    Time:2017.11.17 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
    Location:Hynes Convention Center, 900 Boylston St Boston, MA 02115 United States

    The International Association of Shin Buddhist Studies is hosting two events at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion in Boston, MA, November 2017. One panel features an IBS publication; the other panel is a collaborative project between the IBS and Ryukoku University.

    These events are free and open to the public. Registration for the AAR meeting is not required, though it is encouraged.

    Please contact the IASBS North American District for more information.
    Related Link:http://www.shin-ibs.edu/event/iasbs-events-at-aar/

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       Scholarship
    Doctoral Program in Buddhist Studies at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich posted date:2017-08-01
    Time:Deadline: 2017.10.22

    The Doctoral Program in Buddhist Studies at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich, Germany invites applications for two PhD scholarships for dissertation projects related to Buddhism.

    Deadline for applications: 22 October 2017
    Start of scholarship: summer or autumn 2018
    Duration of scholarship: 3 years
    Scholarship amount: 1000 € per month + insurance + support for rent + travel lump sums + 460 € per year
    Scholarship donor: German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)

    The selection process comprises two stages: Applications are sent to the Doctoral Program in Buddhist Studies in Munich. The program will select promising candidates, who then have to submit their materials to the DAAD. It is expected that the successful candidates will be chosen and informed by February 2018.

    The prerequisites for application are non-German citizenship, a Master of Arts or Magister Artium degree or equivalent in a relevant field, excellent knowledge of at least one Buddhist source language, outstanding qualifications in the subject, and fluency in English. A basic knowledge of German is also desirable, though not a prerequisite, but willingness to learn German/improve German language skills will be expected. Applicants should not have lived in Germany for more than fifteen months at the time of the submission of their materials to the DAAD (in December) and the last final examination should have taken place no more than six years before this date.

    For details concerning the application, please visit our homepage:

    http://www.en.buddhismus-studien.uni-muenchen.de/currentissues/index.html

    http://www.buddhismus-studien.uni-muenchen.de/aktuelles/stipendienausschreibung_2018/phd_s...
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/188887/phd-scholarships-doctoral-program-buddhist-studies-ludwig

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       Work Shop
    Buddhist Women: Practitioners and Teachers Past and Present posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.09.30
    Location:DHARMA DRUM VANCOUVER CENTER, 8240 No. 5 Road Richmond, BC V6Y 2V4, Canada

    www.ddmba.ca

    (604) 277-1357

    nfo@ddmba.ca



    Saturday, September 30, 2017

    9:00am ~ 4:40 pm



    In this workshop we will hear about the activities of Buddhist women in both historical and contemporary contexts. The speakers will present examples from different cultural spheres, including China, Japan, and the US. Audience members will have opportunities to ask questions and participate in discussions about the inclusion of women in teaching and practice of the Dharma. Please register in advance: www.ddmba.ca



    Workshop Schedule

    Each presentation consists of 1 hour lecture, followed by 10 minutes Q & A.



    9:00 - 9:10 Welcome

    9:10 - 10:20: Beata Grant, Professor, Washington University in St. Louis

    “Teacher, Traveler and Loyalist: The Poems and Gathas of Female Chan Master Jizong Xingche (b. 1606)”



    10:20 - 10:40 Break



    10:40 - 11:50: Chun-fang Yu, Professor Emerita, Columbia University

    “Buddhist Nuns in Contemporary Taiwan”



    12:00 - 1:30 Lunch Break



    1:30 - 2:40: Paula Arai, Associate Professor, Louisiana State University

    “Leaders & Healers: Women and Japanese Buddhism”



    2:40 - 3:00 Break



    3:00 - 4:10: Susan Moon, Author and Dharma Teacher, Everyday Zen Sangha

    “Contemporary Western Female Teachers: Three Profiles of Women Expressing Interdependence”



    4:10 - 4:40 Wrap-up discussion moderated by Wendi Adamek, Associate Professor, University of Calgary



    Organizer: Dharma Drum Vancouver Center



    Co-sponsors:

    University of Calgary, The Numata Chair in Buddhist Studies, Department of Classics and Religion

    University of British Columbia, The Robert N. Ho Family Foundation Program in Buddhism and Contemporary Society
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/230590/workshop-buddhist-women-practitioners-and-teachers-past-and

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    Graduate Students Workshop: “Buddhist Theories of Embodiment” posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.10.07 09:00 ~ 16:00
    Location:BUILDING 70-72A1, MAIN QUAD



    BY INVITATION ONLY MAP

    Graduate Students Workshop:

    "Foul Wombs, Lacquered Devices, and the Ancient Tampon: Reading (Critically) for Female Agency in Indian Buddhist Texts"

    Abstract:

    Scholarly literature on the female body in Indian Buddhism has focused on the extreme negativity of its representations and usually posited its bad effects on women. Vinaya scholarship on Buddhist monasticism has emphasized its paternalism, assuming the creation and implementation of vinaya to be elite, androcentric, and rigidly hierarchical. This paper reconsiders the question of the agentive female in relationship to the trope of the foul female body in an important Indian sūtra on the birth process entitled the Garbhāvakrānti-sūtra, and representations of female sexuality and reproductive processes in vinaya texts, especially those located in the Sanskrit Bhikṣuṇī-vinaya of the Mahāsāṅghika-lokottaravādins. It draws also on postcolonial feminist critiques of the liberal secular feminist concept of agency in order to reconsider the possibility of female innovation and agency in shaping ancient female ascetic lives.

    Amy Paris Langenberg is a specialist in Indian Buddhism. She earned her Ph.D. in Religious Studies from Columbia University and is now an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Eckerd College.

    "Buddha Bodies, Bodhisattva Bodies, Maternal Bodies, Animal Bodies: Reflections on the Body in Indian Buddhism"

    Abstract:

    Buddhist literature from India depicts a wide range of different types of bodies, including the beautiful bodies of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, the highly controlled bodies of disciplined monks, the disgusting bodies of tempting women, the nurturing bodies of loving mothers, and the intensely suffering bodies of animals, ghosts, and hell-beings. How can we make sense of these widely varying images, and what do they have to tell us about embodiment itself?

    Reiko Ohnuma is Professor of Religion, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Dartmouth College.

    "Rethinking Embodiment, Gender, and Agency in Medieval Japanese Buddhism”

    Abstract:

    This paper focuses on conceptions of embodiment and agency in medieval Japanese literary/Buddhist texts to argue that far from being universal or ahistorical, these terms have very specific significations that only become intelligible when understood within the broader Buddhist epistemic framework of medieval Japan.

    Rajyashree Pandey is Reader in Asian Studies at the Politics department of Goldsmiths, University of London.

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/graduate-students-workshop-buddhist-theories-embodiment

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    Special Workshop on Early Chinese Buddhist Translations with Jan Nattier at Yale University posted date:2017-06-21
    Time:2017.10.13 ~ 2017.10.15
    Location:Department of Religious Studies, Yale University

    With the generous support of the Research Center for Buddhist Texts and Arts (Peking University), the Department of Religious Studies at Yale University is pleased to announce a special 3-day workshop on early Chinese Buddhist translations led by Professor Jan Nattier, to be held on October 13-15, 2017 at Yale. The full description of the topics to be covered is given below.

    Professor Nattier is one of world’s foremost experts on the rarely-studied corpus of early Chinese translations of Buddhist texts, and this workshop is a unique opportunity to read such materials with her. The workshop is open and free of charge to all interested graduate students and faculty. Lunches and dinners will be provided for all participants.

    FUNDING is available to cover travel and accommodation expenses in New Haven for a limited number of graduate students coming from anywhere in North America. To apply for funding, you must be enrolled in, or set to begin in fall 2017, a relevant MA or PhD program. Please send a brief cover letter explaining your reasons for wishing to attend and your background and qualifications. Your advisor at your home institution must also send a (brief) email indicating your status and confirming that you have their support to attend. When applying for funding, please indicate what city you will be traveling from.

    The final DEADLINE for applying for funding is August 1st 2017, but funding will be allocated on a rolling basis (first-come first-serve). Funding is limited, so you are encouraged to apply as soon as you can.

    Anyone not applying for funding must still REGISTER to confirm their participation, no later than September 1st 2017.

    Please direct all inquiries and send funding/registration applications to: eric.greene@yale.edu



    The specific topic of the workshop will be two unusual Chinese versions of the story of the final nirvana (i.e., the death) of the Buddha’s foster mother, Mahāprajāpatī: 大愛道般泥洹經 (T144) and 佛母般泥洹經(T145). We will consider, first of all, how to evaluate the translator attributions given in the received tradition. Having established the probable dates and attributions of these texts, we will begin to read through them, discussing what to do with Buddhist names and terms that are not registered in existing dictionaries. We will then compare these two Chinese versions with other versions of the story extant in Chinese, Tibetan, and Pāli, in an attempt to place the texts we have read within their historical context.

    Reading materials for the workshop will be entirely in Chinese, and a basic competence in classical/literary Chinese will be assumed of all participants. Those with knowledge of other Buddhist scriptural languages are welcome to use those to consult parallels to our texts, but such collateral work will not be expected or required.



    Eric Greene

    Department of Religious Studies
    Yale University
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/183440/workshop-special-workshop-early-chinese-buddhist-translations-jan

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    The challenge of postcolonial philosophy in India: Too alien for contemporary philosophers, too modern for Sanskritists? posted date:2017-06-07
    Time:2017.09.28 ~ 2017.09.29
    Location:Hollandstraße 11-13, 1020 Vienna, 2nd floor seminar room

    The workshop is open to the public. For organizational purposes, you are kindly invited to announce your participation with an email to pascale.hugon@oeaw.ac.at.

    Schedule

    09:30 – 10:15
    Reinier Langelaar (Austrian Academy of Sciences): The Apical Ancestor: 14th-15th ct. Biography in the Service of the Phag-mo-gru Ruling House

    10:15 – 11:00
    Suzanne Bessenger (Randolph College): Independent Dakini or Yab Yum Duo? Sonam Peldren, Rinchen Pel, and the Role of Life Writing in Tibetan Sainthood

    11:00 – 11:15 Coffee break

    11:15 – 12:00
    Samuel Thévoz (The Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation Program in Buddhist Studies): Adrup Gönbo’s Nga rang gi skyid sdug gi rnam thar: Modernity and Subjectivity in a Concise Guidebook to the Hidden-Land of France

    See also: Abstracts (PDF)

    Speakers

    Reinier Langelaar studied Religious Studies at the University of Leiden and received his MA in Central Asian Studies from the Humboldt University in Berlin. His research interests include matters of Tibetan relatedness (kinship), social organization, and origin narratives. Langelaar's dissertation project focuses on late medieval "clan genealogies" (gdung-rabs), with special attention to documents pertaining to the Rlangs-lha-gzigs lineage associated with the Phag-mo-gru ruling house that ruled the central Tibetan Plateau from 1354-ca. 1480. (reinier.langelaar@oeaw.ac.at)

    Suzanne Bessenger is a Professor of Religious Studies at Randolph College (VA, USA). She is the author of Echoes of Enlightenment: The Life and Legacy of Sönam Peldren (2016, Oxford University Press). (sbessenger@randolphcollege.edu)

    Samuel Thévoz's research focuses mainly on European travel literature to Tibet and modern Buddhism in theater. He is the author of Un horizon infini: Explorateurs et voyageurs français au Tibet (1846-1912). Paris: University Press of Paris-Sorbonne, 2010, and edited the re-print of Marie de Ujfalvy-Bourdon, Voyage d’une Parisienne dans l’Himalaya, Paris: Transboréal, 2014. (samuelthevoz@gmail.com)
    Related Link:http://www.ikga.oeaw.ac.at/Events/Tibetan_Biographical_Writings_2017

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    Buddhist chants and songs by Ani Choying Drolma posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.11.11 17:00 ~ 18:30
    Location:Stanford Memorial Church

    Buddhist chants and songs by Ani Choying Drolma

    5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

    Stanford Memorial Church

    Free and open to the public

    Tickets required: Stanford Ticket Office
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/celebrating-our-twenty-year-milestone

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    Shomyo: a vocal music performance Daihannya Tendoku–e posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.11.10 19:00 ~ 20:30
    Location:Stanford Memorial Church

    Shomyo: a vocal music performance Daihannya Tendoku–e

    A “Rolling Reading” of the Great Sutra on the Perfection of Wisdom by the Karyobinga Shomyo Kenkyukai

    7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

    Stanford Memorial Church

    Free and open to the public

    Tickets required: Stanford Ticket Office
    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/celebrating-our-twenty-year-milestone

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    "Daihannya Tendoku-e" Performed by Karyōbinga Shōmyō Kenkyūkai posted date:2017-09-21
    Time:2017.11.10 19:00 ~ 20:30
    Location:STANFORD MEMORIAL CHURCH


    FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC MAP

    TICKETS REQUIRED: VISIT: STANFORD TICKET OFFICE

    Kashōken, an internationally renowned ensemble of Japanese Shingon priests, will perform a Daihannya Tendoku, a “rolling reading” of the Great Sutra on the Perfection of Wisdom (Mahāprajñāpāramitā sūtra) at the Memorial Church of Stanford University. The Daihannya Tendoku is one of the most important rituals of Japanese Buddhism. It features the Great Sutra on the Perfection of Wisdom, one of the central texts of Mahayana Buddhism, and with 600 fascicles also the longest text in the Buddhist canon. Since the early eighth century, rituals centered on a reading of this sutra have been performed in Japan.

    In early times, several hundred clerics gathered for several days to read the sutra character by character. However, this was often impractical, or even impossible, as not enough clerics were present to recite the entire text. For this reason, clerics sought to find ways to abbreviate the ritual. When sutra books in concertina format were introduced, clerics started to just skim through the text by having the pages of the book quickly glide from one hand to other, while loudly exclaiming the titles of the sutra and its volumes, as well as a few lines of the sutra itself. This way of reading, called “rolling reading,” resulted in the dramatic visual effect of accordion-like sutra pages cascading through the air. Paired with the sound of loud voices intoning the titles of the sutra and its volumes, the ritual creates what the priests call a “wind of wisdom.” In today’s concert, Kashoken invites you on a journey to the sounding world of Japanese esoteric Buddhism, to feel the breath of the “wind of wisdom” yourself.

    Contact Phone:
    650.721.6609
    Event Sponsor:
    Department of Music, Humanities Center, Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford, Office for Religious Life, Department of Religious Studies, Center for South Asia, Center for East Asian Studies, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures
    Contact Email:
    tanya@stanford.edu
    More Information:
    http://sto.stanfordtickets.org/single/SelectSeating.aspx?p=7940#link

    Related Link:https://buddhiststudies.stanford.edu/events/daihannya-tendoku-e-performed-kary-binga-sh-my-kenky-kai

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    New books on Japanese Buddhism, Call for Reviewers posted date:2017-02-22
    Time:2017.02.19

    Please contact Erez Joskovich if you are interested in reviewing one of the following books:
    Bowring, Richard J. In Search of the Way: Thought and Religion in Early-Modern Japan, 1582-1860, 2017.
    Stone, Jacqueline I. Right Thoughts at the Last Moment: Buddhism and Deathbed Practices in Early Medieval Japan, 2016.

    Reviewers should have demonstrated intellectual expertise and possess or be in the final stages of completion of a doctoral degree in a relevant field.

    erez_j@berkeley.edu
    Related Link:https://networks.h-net.org/node/6060/discussions/167821/call-reviewers-new-books-japanese-buddhism

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    The Barn Retreat: Six Day Meditation Retreat posted date:2016-12-15
    Time:2017.01.15~2017.09.24
    Location:Barn Retreat Centre

    The Barn Retreat Centre runs Six Day Meditation Retreats every week of the year starting on Sundays. Please visit the booking page for dates and availability.

    This classic Barn retreat schedule (see below) enables retreatants to develop a mindful approach to life, work and relationships. Reconnecting with the natural environment, and with enquiry and discussion in contemporary western Buddhism, retreatants increase awareness and understanding of themselves and others.

    Accommodation and Community Living
    Every retreatant has a single room. Living as a small community of up to 12 people (including 2 coordinators), we share household tasks, and cook and eat together. In the afternoons there is free time to practise individually: use our extensive library, talk to like minded people, or walk in our beautiful 550 acre Sharpham Estate. Evening meals are prepared individually or in groups.

    Meditation
    We provide six guided meditation sessions and also offer further guidance in meditation practice for beginners on request. Our experienced staff and visiting teachers help deepen your understanding of mindfulness based meditation and its relation to Buddhist philosophy.

    Organic Gardening
    We grow most of our own vegetables in our organic gardens. When on retreat you will be eating produce grown by previous retreatants, and being kept warm by the wood they chopped - the house is heated by a wood furnace. We therefore spend our mornings gardening and working in the woodlands. This is a chance to practise bringing the awareness cultivated in our meditation into meaningful activity, and to ensure that future retreatants enjoy fresh organic produce. This also helps us to keep our fees low. (NB. We cater for people with all physical abilities.)

    Cost and how to book
    Standard rate £270; Supported rate £205. (Full board) Click here for details about the supported rate and bursaries.
    All rooms are single occupancy.
    You can book easily and securely online below or by phoning 01803 732661 or by emailing us.

    Related Link:http://www.sharphamtrust.org/Event-Details-Retreats/The-Barn-Retreat-Six-Day-Meditation-Retreat

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