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Why Buddhism and the West Need Each Other: On the Interdependence of Personal and Social Transformation
Author Loy, David
Source Journal of Buddhist Ethics
Volumev.20
Date2013
PublisherDepartment of History &Religious Studies Program , The Pennsylvania State University
Publisher Url http://history.psu.edu
LocationUniversity Park, PA, US
Content type期刊論文=Journal Article
Language英文=English
AbstractThe highest ideal of the Western tradition has been the concern to restructure our societies so that they are more socially just. The most important goal for Buddhism is to awaken and (to use the Zen phrase) realize one’s true nature, which puts an end to dukkha—especially that associated with the delusion of a separate self. Today it has become more obvious that we need both: not just because these ideals complement each other, but also because each project needs the other. The Western (now worldwide) ideal of a social transformation that institutionalizes social justice has achieved much, yet, I argue, is limited because a truly good society cannot be realized without the correlative realization that personal transformation is also necessary. On the other side, the traditional Buddhist emphasis on ending individual dukkha is insufficient in the face of what we now understand about the structural causes of dukkha. This does not mean simply adding a concern for social justice to Buddhist teachings. For example, applying a Buddhist perspective to structural dukkha implies
an alternative evaluation of our economic situation. Instead of appealing for distributive justice, this approach focuses on the consequences of individual and institutionalized delusion: the dukkha of a sense of a self that feels separate from others, whose sense of lack consumerism exploits and institutionalizes into economic structures that assume a life (and motivations) of their own.
ISSN10769005 (E)
Hits183
Created date2014.07.14
Modified date2017.07.13



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